25 November 2021

New project alert! We’ve been awarded this ambitious extension and retrofit project on a site bordering a conservation area in the south of Oxford. Behind the rear garden sits this beautiful church tower and a series of protected trees, ensuring that this stunning view will remain. The existing house is a 1960s semi, not a typical house type, and very wide with lots of potential. There will be many creative opportunities to capture and make the most of this wonderful view.

The building is in a poor state of repair. This means that every room will need some form of refurbishment / upgrade. This represents a rare opportunity but is absolutely the best time to carry out a whole-house low energy retrofit. We will be insulating and making airtight the whole building fabric, without forgetting about proper ventilation too. In the words of our client: “We have got to do the insulation and replace all the windows. It would be a false economy not to.”

We’re architects who specialise in combining extension with retrofit. It’s so rewarding that we can make a positive contribution towards this important movement. Talk to us if you have a project in mind.

18 November 2021

Project completion in Oxford! One of our smallest extension projects, but one of the most effective. At only 2.5m wide x 3m in length, this tiny space makes all the difference in linking the existing dining room to the kitchen. Previously a fully glazed conservatory, the space was never used for proper living, reaching seasonal temperature extremes while being split across different levels. It became more of a thoroughfare and dumping ground, and a real missed opportunity.

The existing side wall to the kitchen was demolished half way down to form a breakfast bar. Above that, a downstand beam simplifies support to the wall above, while creating a very practical hanging spot for pots, pans, and cooking utensils. The external doors to the dining room were removed and the opening made wider to create an open plan layout, allowing light, air, and human interaction to cross all three spaces. We love the hanging pot plants within the vaulted ceiling space.

We’re architects that love projects of all sizes. Sometimes the smallest can be the most rewarding. Talk to us if you have a project in mind. More photos on the website to follow soon!

28 October 2021

Planning permission granted for our extension project in Wolvercote! One of the main reasons our client bought this house was due to the fact that the site backs on to the stunning Port Meadow. The problem with the existing house is that it doesn’t take advantage of the potential views. We’ve designed a rear extension and loft conversion with some big picture windows that will not only capture new views but will also introduce lots more natural daylight into the new spaces.

The asymmetric roof form was not an arbitrary decision. It allows the extension ridge beam to sit on existing structure within the main house, while also forming a large single door into the garden – something our client preferred over the more fashionable bi-folds, which aren’t for everyone. The asymmetry makes the south side of the roof steeper, allowing rooflights to receive more solar gain during winter months. The picture window sill has been raised to form a seating area.

As architects, we think meticulously about all design decisions, considering how a building will be constructed and how it will respond to its environment. Talk to us if you have a project in mind.

14 October 2021

Construction starts on our new build house project in Oxford! It’s been a long time coming. The existing bungalow has now been demolished to make way for a stunning new low energy house. The ground is currently being excavated and compacted in preparation for the insulated raft slab to be laid, before the timber frame flies up in a matter of weeks. This can be achieved as the panels are manufactured off-site. Speed of construction was the main reason for choosing timber frame.

Another good reason is the low embodied energy of timber. Combined with the use of mineral wool (friction fitted to minimise heat loss through infiltration) and cellulose (blown in recycled paper) insulation, the building fabric will have a low environmental impact, and will achieve Passivhaus standard u-values. Airtightness, which goes hand in hand with high levels of insulation, can also be more easily achieved with off-site fabrication, where joints are simply taped up on site.

These are both exciting and nervy times. With construction projects, there will always be ups and downs, but the end product will be amazing. We’re looking forward to helping our client get there.

23 September 2021

New project alert! It’s another extension and low energy retrofit of a 1930s semi in Oxford. In fact, it’s on the same street as a previous project. We’re delighted that our existing clients recommended our architect services to their neighbours. While it’s the same house type, the design brief and neighbouring conditions are quite different, so this will be a bespoke design solution. This house benefits from a much larger garden too, which will accommodate a new garden studio.

These houses have small and dark entrance halls. The first step will be to create a more generous and naturally lit welcome to the new home. This generosity of space will flow through the house, opening it up to the extraordinary example of a garden, as we take down internal walls and create a new open plan space to the rear. The first floor will benefit from an additional double bedroom and reconfiguration, while the rest of the house will be insulated to improve thermal comfort.

We’re specialists at combining extension with retrofit. It’s the most economical time to do it when there’s already disruption. Talk to us if you’re looking for an architect to help with your project.

16 September 2021

“The Oxfordshire Great Big Green Week is 8 days of events (Sept. 18 – 26th 2021) helping and encouraging people and organisations to act to help tackle the climate crisis, and to protect and improve our environment. The Week takes place five weeks before world leaders meet in Glasgow for the United Nations ‘COP26’ Climate Conference. It is part of the national ‘Great Big Green Week’.

There are over 75 events across the county – mostly organised by voluntary groups but also by businesses, colleges, councils and schools. The Week will help people to take action, to celebrate what is already being done, and to send the strongest possible message to politicians in the UK and world leaders at the UN event: we are stepping up to meet the environmental challenges we face – we expect you to do the same.”

Learn more here: https://greenweekoxon.co.uk/

See a programme of events here: https://greenweekoxon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/GBGWProgrammeA5.pdf

02 September 2021

“It’s time for every UK household to declare a climate emergency. In the UK nearly 20% of all carbon equivalent emissions are a result of energy used in our homes. In fact, homes make up one of the largest single sources of carbon emissions in the country. We will not meet our targets without near complete decarbonisation of the housing stock. A recent report by the IPCC demonstrates the immensity of the challenges we face unless we take urgent action together.

Many households want to make retrofit improvements to their homes, but they lack support or don’t know where to start. These are the problems we want to solve. With the UK hosting COP26 this November, it’s time for every household to send a clear message. Declaring a climate emergency via this platform allows us to use our collective voice to send a strong message to the government, whilst providing resources to help us learn together.”

Join us and the network of households across the country to make a commitment to positive action. To find out more and to sign up, go to: www.householdsdeclare.org

26 August 2021

New project alert! We’re excited to start another retrofit project in collaboration with Cosy Homes Oxfordshire. It’s another Victorian terrace in a conservation area, this time in Jericho, Oxford. To preserve its lovely brick walls, we’ll be insulating internally with wood fibre for its vapour permeability and low embodied energy. The ancient boiler is at the end of its life, so will be replaced with an ASHP. Solar PV will provide a top up to heating and hot water, as well as electricity.

The client wanted to bring an architect on board to help with re-planning the house. The kitchen is sited in the basement, which gives it limited access to daylight. We will re-plan the kitchen and turn a window into a set of French doors. This will introduce an abundance of natural light, opening it up to the lovely courtyard garden. On upper floors, flat ceilings will be made vaulted and rooflights installed, again to introduce natural light into a dark bathroom and stairway.

Talk to us if you’re thinking about a low energy retrofit alongside more substantial alterations to your home. Get in touch with Cosy Homes Oxfordshire to register for a ‘Whole House Plan’.

19 August 2021

Code red for humanity! The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report sends a dire warning about the irreversible damage to our climate and environment. Global warming of 1.5 and 2 degrees will be exceeded this century if we don’t reduce emissions. We all have a responsibility to do something about it. Collectively, and in the run up to COP26, we need to make enough noise that our leaders and policymakers will take notice and take action. So, what can we do?

1. Back the Climate and Ecological Emergency (CEE) Bill as an individual and / or organisation.

2. Sign up to Households Declare to demand that the UK government establishes a national retrofit strategy.

3. Join the Climate Protest Day on Monday 23rd August to support this call to action.

We have done / will be doing all three and would encourage you to do the same. Let’s support these important campaigns together to push for the systemic change needed for our survival.

22 July 2021

Progress on one of our low energy retrofit projects in Oxford is coming along nicely! A number of factors meant that we specified internal wall insulation (IWI), in this case a wood fibre board, which has the rigidity to stay upright against the walls. Not only does wood fibre have a low embodied energy, it is vapour permeable, which is important for reducing the risk of condensation in solid brick walls. A lime-based parge coat seals and evens up the wobbly brickwork behind the boards.

As architects, we spend a lot of time on the computer / drawing board, so it’s particularly important for us to see the construction of our projects on site, and to get feedback from those building it. The use of lime-based products on these buildings is important, again, for vapour permeability. However, this does result in much longer drying times compared to cement-based alternatives. This needs to be factored in early on, as it will have an effect on a project’s programme.

We’re taking a bit of a summer break from our journal, so there’ll be no posts for the next few weeks. We’re still here though, so do get in touch to discuss your low impact architectural project.